Move D & Benjamin Brunn

“Let's Call It A Day (2lp,gatefold Cover)”

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LabelSmallvilleCat. No.SMALLVILLELP13
FormatEXCLS2LPOrders fromFri, 14 Feb 2020
PricePlease sign in to see price

Review

Tracklist 2LP: A1 On The Magic Bus A2 Grains B1 A B2 Let’s Call It A Day C1 O C2 C-Sick D1 Magnetically Levitated Train Release Info: Can music be classic and contemporary at the same time? Can it contain a secret genetic code in which the summary of the past, the present pulse, and the future view are hidden? Be ahead of its time and not lose relevance along the way? “Let’s Call it A Day” the first album collaboration of German authors Move D (David Moufang) and Benjamin Brunn, which first appeared on a CD on Bine Music in 2006, now remastered by Calyx and on Vinyl for the first time ever, proves it is not only possible hypothetically, but can also live amongst us. This is a complete piece built from seven sections, each one is a microcosm of unique textures, depth, ambience, emotions, programming, looping and melodic rules; Together they are a homogenous creation, a symphony that culminate in dance music experiencing elevation. “Let’s Call it A Day", which in a way is the big brother of “Songs from the Beehive” - their exhilarating installment for Smallville from 2008, is an album above the Zeitgeist. The way Moufang and Brunn fuse different genres together without committing to any musical doctrine, makes them appear prophetic. However, it is in no sense a retrospect feeling; even at the time it was clear that the perceptions, experience, vision, and delicacy of this album were outstanding. Every element here, every frequency, rhythm, turnaround or keyboard tapping, is the material from which masterpieces are made of. From the opening meditative ever evolving loops of On the Magic Bus to the abstract drones of Grains with its almost nonexistent bass drum - like it was aimed to hit the Ambient-House craze of these past few years; through the mesmerising dubbiness of A, which sounds like a rave ending in an echo chamber and the constant micro-movement of the arpeggios in the title track; O, which sounds like a soundtrack for a sinking submarine

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