Victor Cavini

“Japan (lp)”

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LabelBE WITH RECORDSCat. No.BEWITH076LP
FormatEXCLS-LPOrders fromFri, 28 Feb 2020
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Review

Territories: Worldwide no restrictions Track List: A1 : Pictures Of Japan (3:41) A2 : Pictures Of Japan II (1:00) A3 : Pictures Of Japan III (1:08) A4 : Pictures Of Japan IV (2:28) A5 : Pictures Of Japan V (1:52) A6 : Pictures Of Japan VI (1:52) A7 : Pictures Of Japan VII (2:59) B1 : Pictures Of Japan VIII (1:33) B2 : Pictures Of Japan IX (1:57) B3 : Pictures Of Japan X (3:18) B4 : Pictures Of Japan XI (1:50) B5 : Pictures Of Japan XII (2:05) B6 : Pictures Of Japan XIII (2:46) B7 : Pictures Of Japan XIV (2:44) Release Notes: The first Be With foray into the archives of revered German library institution Selected Sound is one of our favourites on the label - the super in-demand Japan from Victor Cavini, originally released in 1983. Rare and sought-after for many years now, this is one of those cult library LPs that never turn up. With Daibutsu the giant Buddha of Kamakura’s presence gracing the hefty front cover, this is a record bursting with dope samples for adventurous producers: it’s koto-funk madness! Victor Cavini was the library music pseudonym of prolific German composer and musician Gerhard Trede. He was known for exploring instruments and styles from around the world (he played over 50 different instruments himself) and Japan is his collection of 14 musical sketches painted with traditional Japanese wind and string instruments. These are the sounds of traditional Japanese folk music re-interpreted through Western ears, with the occassional contemporary twist. Contemporary for 1983, of course. These “Pictures of Japan” are hypnotic, sometimes frantic, but always beautiful. The first twelve tracks offer airy explorations of koto and flute, with other strings and percussion being added and then given their own space. Indeed “Pictures of Japan XII” is just drums. And then “Pictures of Japan XIII” seems to come out of nowhere. But the subtle sleaze of its full band sound still doesn’t quite prepare you for the towering climax of “Pictures of Japan

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