July 28, 2016

Dino Sabatini - Omonimo

outisopera001lp As both a producer and the helmsman of the Outis Music label, Dino Sabatini has carved out a distinctive musical style that shows a great reverence for both ancient archetypes and future possibilities for change (see, for example, his “Mnemosyne” co-release with Edit Select, in which each track is dedicated to a separate Greek goddess). With one foot planted in a mysterious past and the other foot planted in a world yet to arrive, Sabatini’s works are carefully realized emotional journeys that intertwine shimmers of optimism with undercurrents of poignancy or nostalgia. His latest full-length offering, “Omonimo” (that’s “homonym” for non-speakers of Italian), brings all of this to fruition on a record that demands (and rewards) deep listening. After a pulsating “Foreword” massages the mind and prepares it for the story that Sabatini is about to tell, “Choosing the Right Way” blankets the listener in a rainy day ambience punctuated with tantalizingly distant vocal refrains and nimble piano. At once solemn and erotic, it sets the pace perfectly for a set of tracks that have a cohesive feel, yet all use their own sonic vocabulary and color palette to tell unique variations on the story. “It’s My Forest,” for example, sticks to the reliable trip-hop / mid-tempo framework while introducing quick snatches of tabla and signaling, hovering synth arpeggios. “Follow Me” retains the lush synth pads and cycling percussive loops of that track, and then things take a turn for the slightly darker with “The Unexpected,” a sudden uptick in percussive punch and apprehensive intensity. The album’s main, recurring motif of cascading note patterns continues on “Just When

 

July 28, 2016

Kid Flicks - Kid Flicks

klv018Kid Flicks is the music project started by greek producer and songwriter Nickos Devisis. Highly in?uenced by the bright side of contemporary athenian life, multiculturalism and the internet culture, Kid Flicks created a unique sound which draws from various genres and styles. From electronic to sample-based music to psych pop to world music, the album full of upbeat pop melodies, explosive percussion and greek, middle eastern and african music references. Kid Flicks’ third album “Kid Flicks” and first with an updated 3-piece line up, will be released by Klik Records in Greece and wordandsound in the rest of Europe on late June. On December 2015 they showcased at Glimps Festival in Belgium and their creative process and involvement in the athenian music scene were one of the subjects of CBC Arts documentary series “Interrupt This Program". They currently work with Brooklyn-based PR agency Drunken Piano (Carpark, Yep Roc) and booker JJ Pallis (Boogarins).

 

July 28, 2016

Dani Siciliano - Dani Siciliano

CCS102 Dani Siciliano’s latest album is self-titled for a reason; it represents a personal statement crafted by Dani’s own hand - feeding off her accomplished past in experimental pop and electronica and reaching to new tones and timbres in a celebration of musical liberation. Culminating eight years of songwriting, production research and sonic exploration, Circus Company is proud to present Dani Siciliano’s third solo album. Following her two previous solo LPs Likes…(2004) and Slappers(2007), Dani decided to focus on crafting as much of the album by herself as possible, working with just a few select musicians to round out her creative vision. As ever her captivating voice remains centre stage, and you can hear echoes of her earlier work with the likes of Herbert, The Soft Pink Truth, and Brooks tucked away amongst the folds of diverse instrumentation, but this is a record that sounds very much like its own beast. It’s an album of love and unabashed soul that reaches enthusiastically to all the sounds that hold the greatest appeal to Dani. What strikes most about her latest creation is the way the production instinctively frames the narrative of her lyrics, neatly demonstrating the unfettered vision she has been able to realise on this project. New Release Information It’s the balance of the unusual and the immediate that make this such perfect pop music and sits neatly amongst Circus Company’s brooding musicianship of Nôze’s recent Come With Us LP (on which Dani features), Nicolas Jaar and the ever-blurring lines between the avant-garde history of the label and its broad contemporary outlook. Track Notes: If there is a track that captures the multi-faceted sound palette of the record it is surely Blink, which fuses illustrious blasts of bras

 

July 28, 2016

Mogador - Overflow Pool (180g+ mp3+ rev.board sleeve)

fur102Some records just barely nudge your consciousness, but they do so in such an intriguing manner that their tentativeness and ephemerality lure you in deeper than you expect. Such is the case with Overflow Pool by Mogador, a new project by Will Long. This prolific producer—who is best known for his profoundly meditative ambient music under the name Celer—favors the longform, beatless approach to composition, as he lets his rigorously honed tones unspool with a gentle insistence. Overflow Pool consists of three lengthy pieces full of lingering, aqueous chords that are spaced out by suspenseful lacunae. Each piece revolves around episodes of briskly struck piano chord clusters that are left to decay to near silence, for maximal contemplativeness. These are followed by a lowerkeyed retort, as if to ground the listener and to keep her from getting overly optimistic from the preceding burst of Harold Buddonuppers tones. Similarities to Brian Eno’s Thursday Afternoon are also evident, as Mogador methodically doles out morsels of oceanic calm geared to align your chakras like some 21stcentury Stephen Halpern LP. It sounds ideal for flotation tanks, deeptissue massages, and general relaxation. Long observes that Mogador differs from his Celer output “because it’s completely unprocessed. This is a pure room recording with no extra effects; only piano and reeltoreel delay.” The Yokohama, Japanbased musician says that his primary aim with Overflow Pool “was to make something that doesn’t happen all the time—it’s so sparse, that it blends into the room. It happens so seldom that it’s easy to forget about. You just catch it here and there. That’s the feeling I wanted.” It’s a feeling that’s all too rare in modern music—peacefulness without sentimentality.